New Doreen Virtue Book: Saints and Angels

I was just looking around on Amazon, and I stumbled upon Doreen Virtue’s new book: Saints & Angels: A Guide to Heavenly Help for Comfort, Support, and Inspiration.

Saints and Angels book cover

Doreen Virtue’s newest book!

Saints and Angels came out in March (2018) and is one of Doreen Virtue’s LAST BOOKS she will ever write for Hay House, the big metaphysical publishing company. Doreen no longer has a writing contract with Hay House!

I looked at the book sample for Saints and Angels on Amazon.com. The book is very heavy on Biblical references. Every couple paragraphs there is another Bible quote or scripture to look up.

The first chapter is not about saints OR angels; it’s about JESUS! And God. And the Holy Spirit. Part 1 is titled “The Holy Trinity.” See the images below of the book’s contents.

Book contents for Saints and Angels

Book contents (part 1)

In the dedication, Doreen thanks Jesus for saving her.

Doreen Virtue thanks Jesus

Book dedication in Angels and Saints

I wish Doreen had become CHRISTIAN without becoming BORN AGAIN, if you know what I mean.

As always, I am impressed by what a prolific writer she is. The girl gets stuff done!

My only quibble, besides that the book mostly promotes Jesus and the Bible, is that Doreen is not CATHOLIC, yet she is writing about the saints. I mean, it’s kind of weird. Especially since the born-again, non-denominational Christian churches HATE Catholics and all things Catholic! Such as rosaries, the saints and statues of the Virgin Mary. I know because I went to those churches while I was living in The South and I heard all the hate first-hand!

Nonetheless, I will check out Doreen’s book about the saints at the bookstore and see what she wrote about my favorite saints like St. Francis of Assisi, St. Catherine of Siena, St. Joan of Arc, St. Patrick and my patron saint, Saint Therese of Lisieux.

List of saints in Doreen Virtue book

Book contents (part 2)

List of saints in Doreen Virtue book

Book contents (part 3)

SPONSORED LINKS

Interested in buying Saints and Angels by Doreen Virtue? If you buy it from this link to the Hay House website, I get a little bit of money 😉

Or click the box below to find this book on the Hay House website.

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Feast Day of St. Francis

St. Francis is one of my favorite saints because (1) he helped animals and (2) he’s my dad’s patron saint. Catholics don’t talk about animal rights too much, but both Saint Francis and Saint Martin were devoted to the animal kingdom. St. Francis was often observed talking to birds. He could have conversations with them. That’s why you see so many garden statues of St. Francis. Often, the statue will feature birds or double as a birdfeeder/bird bath.

I was reading the new Diana Cooper book about animals and she says the lions in Africa are trying to heal the world with their roars! If you’ve read books about Africa, you know lions make A LOT of vocalizations at night. Sort of a low-pitched rumble. A pride of lions will vocalize together and the rumbly noise will be heard for miles. This is similar to your cat purring in your lap. Diana says both of these sound frequencies are very healing!

Pray for the lions in Africa, and all the big cats around the globe (tigers, panthers, cheetahs, leopards, mountain lions) who are in danger of losing their habitats. Regardless of what you are taught in school or in church, most animals are MORE PSYCHICALLY and SPIRITUALLY ADVANCED than humans!

Happy Michaelmas!

Today is Michaelmas, the special feast day for St. Michael (angel of protection). I swear I forget this day every year! I was watching Doreen Virtue’s weekly YouTube oracle card reading and she mentioned it. The Catholic church now combines this feast day with the ones for St. Gabriel (messenger angel) and St. Raphael (healing angel). Some churches also add St. Uriel (learning angel). 


I think all of these powerful angels deserve their own special day!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

I love St. Patrick’s Day! Growing up Catholic in Wisconsin, there were many Irish people keeping St. Patrick’s Day traditions alive. In fact, one small farming town nearby, New London, is famous for its small parade which includes the local fire trucks, the high school marching band and not much else. LOL. It’s odd that St. Patrick’s Day is such a big holiday when he isn’t a super popular saint the rest of the year…. I looked up some info on St. Patrick:

  • he lived in Medieval times, around 400
  • he was not actually Irish! he was from England, and got sold into slavery, becoming a sheepherder in the Irish countryside
  • he always heard and listened to his spiritual guides – the angels and God – he heard a voice telling him to walk to the sea where he would find a ship and be able to get a free ride back to England which he did, and he returned to Ireland after he dreamed of his Irish friend telling him to come back
  • he had to learn Latin in order to become a Catholic priest, which was hard for him as he hadn’t had much schooling
  • he lived at the same time as St. Brighid (see my blog post about her) and is buried with her in the town of Downpatrick, County Down, in Northern Ireland – this is disputed by some but it’s believed a few relics of each (part of the body but not the whole body = ewww!) plus St. Columba are buried here
  • the imagery of him defeating the snake and driving them out of Ireland is likely a metaphor for the pagan religions (like the Celts practiced) which dwindled after he made Catholicism so popular in Ireland (sorry, pagans!)
  • it’s said his symbol is the 3-leafed clover because he used it to explain the Trinity (God the father, Jesus the son and the Holy Ghost) to new Catholics, however this is also an ancient Celtic symbol

draw Celtic knot shamrock

One of my favorite angel ladies, the Irish Lorna Byrne, says she sees St. Patrick with many Celtic (pronounced “keltic” with a hard “k”) symbols around him, like the shamrock and the famous Celtic knotwork. She thinks he has become a symbol for of all Ireland, including the ancient Celtic beliefs (pagan). She also says the Irish are a very special people, very pure in spirit. She says you will find Irish communities all over the world because God tasked them with bringing their beautiful spirituality to all corners of the globe. How sweet!

Saint Brighid, the Celtic Fire Goddess

Brighid (bridge-id), also spelled Brigid or Brigit, is both a Celtic fire goddess and a Catholic saint. First, she was a Celtic fire goddess in Ireland. Her pagan holiday is Imbolc (i-molk), February 1st, which celebrates the beginning of spring and the birth of new livestock. In the 5th century, Catholics adopted her story and transferred parts of her legend onto a nun who ran an abbey in Kildare, Ireland. They kept her feast day of February 1st. And they kept her association with the pagan element of fire by having the nuns look after an eternal flame in her honor.

Brighid or Brigid the Celtic goddess

The pagan Brighid has sexy, flaming red hair and is a powerful woman who protects people and is a symbol of fertility. She is also associated with healing (magickal wells are another symbol for her). The Irish people still handweave St. Brighid’s crosses from green reeds/rushes. They are hung over doorways for protection. In the town of Kildare, in central-eastern Ireland, you can visit her original church and abbey called the Church of the Oak (the oak tree being a pagan symbol) and a cathedral built in her honor in 1223.

Saint Brighid prayer card

Her Catholic prayer cards show a more subdued woman, wearing the black outfit of a nun and holding a long staff in her hand which marks her status as an abbess, or headmaster of an abbey where nuns and priests live. She is also shown with white roses and white lilies, the color white being a special color for her.